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assume that the national government must at all costs remain support of the four slave states within the union. those in light blue. so called loyal border states, delaware, missouri, maryland and especially kentucky top do that, he believed, the republicans must not an antagonize those states politically powerful slave holders. antagonize them by interfering with slavery in the succeeding states at least not interfering with them anymore than necessary. lincoln was sure that if he did otherwise the slave holders would pick up and leave as well. second lincoln assumes that only a small minority in the succeeding states really support succession. he and other republicans believe that the great majority of white southerners in the confederacy. slave holders and nonslave holders alike. loyal abiding citizens who had been tricked in to suck us is suggestion by a minority of extremists. leaving slavery alone would hopefully, win them back in to the union. that is the expectations. but after a full year of war, and despite lincoln's efforts to spare their property and feelings, precious fe
their individual wealth and privileges to cooperate fully with the confederate government struggling to protect the interests of slave owners as a whole. and those are aspects of the book that i'm discussing with you today. but this evening i'd like to talk to you about the most important fissure that ran through the house of dixie, slavery, and the three ways slavery figured in the origin and the progress of the o civil war. first of all, the war's central cause. secondly, as a crucial source of military power deployed during that war. and, third, slavery's erosion during the war and its destruction both of those things as an eventual union goal. the destruction of slavery as an eventual conscious, deliberate union goal. so let's start with cause. as you may know, in a recent national survey half of all those people, half of all those americans when were polled deny that slavery was the main cause of the u.s. civil war. and that view is apparently gaining ground, not losing ground. because among younger people polled, those below 30 years of age, fully three out of five denied slavery's centra
." this inauguration ceremony marks a new beginning, a new dedication within our government, and a new spirit among us all. a president may sense and proclaim that new spirit, but only a people can provide it. two centuries ago, our nation's birth was a milestone in the long quest for freedom. but the bold and brilliant dream which excited the founders of this nation still awaits its consummation. i have no new dream to set forth today, but rather urge a fresh faith in the old dream. ours was the first society openly to define itself in terms of both spirituality and human liberty. it is that unique self-definition which has given us an exceptional appeal, but it also imposes on us a special obligation to take on those moral duties which, when assumed, seem invariably to be in our own best interests. you have given me a great responsibility--to stay close to you, to be worthy of you, and to exemplify what you are. let us create together a new national spirit of unity and trust. your strength can compensate for my weakness, and your wisdom can help to minimize my mistakes. let us learn together and lau
and the rest of the world. we can only build on science. you have to work with government supporters business, parliamentarians, with any stakeholder that understands and is willing to engage in education and managing risk for the future. the first product to the first idea that people that got together in the early parts of the decade serenade instrument for international cooperation. that is key here. they started working on what became the framework for action. i hope at least 10% of you have heard about this. maybe. i'm used to it not being very familiar, but i'm also very used to that people now ascendant when we start describing it. the framework for action was sick to duration of the previous details. there have been neo, strategy, which was strongly science-based, so there's other strategies, but the new strategy was really about globalization. it was really setting a framework for what outcome, both leinster to shoot goals and priorities in the sense of the people who put this together on the site thinks he will be in a safer a safer world. the adoption of the framework for action ha
that we've had is that the western government that had citizens in algeria, they weren't given much information on what was going on the ground. many countries weren't given a heads-up that a raid was being launched. this type of information we're getting right now really is not helping the families who don't know about their loved ones. over the course of next 48 hours we hope it will get better but it appears algeria isn't prepared or able to provide the type of information that loved ones and western governments really need to sort this out. >> gregg: coner, thanks very much. >> heather: next-door in mali go a setback to terrorists linked to al-qaeda now retreating after days of french air strikes. the military in mali says they are complete control there. streets reportedly a landscape of burned out vehicles and destroyed weapons. a spokesman for the french forces is sounding a more cautious note saying it's not clear all the militants have left. french forces are moving northward into rebel held territory. >> gregg: more turmoil in the region. new violence erupting in egypt. pr
for by the government. once the president leaves and heads to the white house, his committee has got to pay for everything. the paper all things related -- they pay for all things related to the balls. raising the funds for private sources to underwrite what is going on. ronald reagan gets a lot credit for moving the inauguration when he did not move the inauguration. he moved the inauguration of four years later. that was in 1985. it was below 7 degrees. it was a bitter cold day in washington. the reagan white house the night before looking at the weather forecast thought it was cruel and unusual punishment to make people outside in this weather. they call the chairman of the rules committee and the inaugural committee and said, we think it should be moved aside to the rotunda. being part of a joint committee, he thought the best thing was to call tip o'neill. it was finally tracked down in a bar where he was watching a basketball game kindre. said, it is his inauguration he should have it where he wants it. congress cooperated and move it aside. -- moved it inside. most people saw it on t
repairs on the national on the association's hand that governs the national mall so that is a virtual cross when we come to it but there's a number of civic minded things we will be able to do if we are lucky enough to have access funds when it said and done. >> whoever can address this how many law enforcement agencies and officers will be involved in the security on the date of the inauguration and also how large an area will be closed off with street closures? >> for stila to apologize for saying it was morning when i was actually afternoon. but to answer your question we cannot go into detail as far as how many law enforcement officers will be present for the inauguration. can you repeat the second question for me? >> [inaudible] >> i can't go into detail unfortunately. >> -- area closed off. >> we have road closures and effectively to talk with you after words to provide you with those. >> [inaudible] >> with all events that happened on the capitol complex, we train constantly to address them. as far as specific threats, i can't answer that right now. but just know myself -- boug
us for so long no longer apply. the question we have today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works, whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. whether the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. where the answer is no, programs will end. and those of us who manage the public's dollars will be held to account to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day because only then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government. nor is the question before us whether the market is a force for good or ill. its power to generate wealth and expand freedom is unmatched, but this crisis has reminded us that without a watchful eye, the market can spin out of control. a nation cannot prosper long when it favors only the prosperous. the success our economy has always depended not just on the size of our gdp, but on the reach of our prosperity, on our ability to extend opportunity to every willing heart not out of charity, but because it is the surest
to start governing from a con seventive perspective. and i don't know what everybody else said about the deal we're going to do tomorrow but i'm actually ok with what leadership is doing right now because they actually have an agenda. the agenda is to get to balance in 10 years, to have a balanced budge, not just to pass a budget that balances in 10 year bus to actually achieve balance in 10 years. if you look at what we're going to do, we're going to pass a three or four-month extension of the debt ceiling. then we're going to get into a fight on the sequester and hold the line of the sequester. this is a promise the leadership is making to us. as long as they keep that promise i think many conservatives will be ok with that. then when we get to the debt ceiling fight we're going to ask for at a minimum the one--- the one-for-one cuts that come from the boehner rule for any long-term debt ceiling extension system of if we look at that, it means that in 10 to 15 years, with very little help from the democrats, we can achieve a balanced budget which is much better than even the 23- to
lowered their expectations -- there's always debate about what the proper role of government ought to be. i suspect it will have more of that in the coming days about what the proper role government should be -- what are our expectations? are they too low? some of my friends on the right will see the opposite -- the expectations of government are too high. talk to me about expectations -- what do we have a right to the world? >> i think it is important what they were saying about what should be done -- it is not theory, it is actually being done in countries around the world with demonstrated, proven results. every child in many countries in europe start out with that preschool. the results are that unlike this country, there is not hereditary poverty. it is proven -- this is not a theory. what you are saying about the health system is completely proven. our health system costs an extra $750 billion a year for exactly the same services that you would get in other countries. at the institute of medicine issued a report that the waste and fraud that comes from this for-profit system is 5%
-long debates about the role of government for all time but it does require us to act in our time. (applause) for now decisions are upon us and we cannot afford delay. we cannot mistake absolutism for principle or substitute spectacle for politics or treat name calling as reasoned debate. we must act knowing that our work will be imperfect. (applause) let us of us now embrace with solemn duty an awesome joy what is our lasting birth right with common effort and common purpose with passion and dedication let us answer the call of history and carnto anncertain future that precious light of freedom. >> rose: joining me now from washington, d.c. al hunt of bloomberg, jodi kantor of the "new york times," john dickerson of "slate" and cbs news. here in new york, mark halperin of "time" magazine. al, let me start with you. before we talk about the speech, just talk about the ambience of this inauguration. >> these are wonderful weekends. this is a long weekend. whether it's republican or democrat people who come are in a great mood of celebration, they're walking the streets. i love inaugural weeke
of the american people and to govern the. "national review" as a very intellectual magazine throughout its existence and i think probably even more so in its early years in the 50s and 60's. a very much needed i think bill buckley managing editor and every other major person there acknowledge to that they very much needed a man just like bill rusher to serve as a lyrical eyes and ears, as a political counselor, as a link between "national review" type people. as rusher tended to put it, the intellectuals and the practical politician. by politicians rusher didn't mean people aspired to public office but the mastermind of the goldwater campaign and the marshal of the goldwater campaign. white too was a politician and rusher was something of a politician. in other words if practitioner of actual politics. russia placed tremendous value on these people, and he was always trying with some success to get the more philosophical conservatives. a classic example of course being buckley himself to appreciate that sort of career and that sort of individual and that sort of effort. a lot of what you'l
: will america buy that we the people is now we the government. we will report. you will decide. >>brian: one guy i know does buy it. it looks like he'll have his media in the corner with the president of the united states. this network executive heard an article telling the president to pulverize and destroy republicans. you can go for their throats. we see him sunday with bob schieffer. we can't make this up. we'll review it only for you on "fox & friends." >>steve: it is the coldest day of the winter so far here in new york city. that is why it was a good decision to go indoors today. >>gretchen: you know even though i grew up in minnesota, i hate the cold weather. so let's pretend it is 90 degrees and go for it. >>brian: yesterday 600,000 people happy yesterday was a little warmer. it was at a minimum 800,000 shy from four years prior. the balls that followed, the parade that ensued. it's always a great day in america. >>gretchen: for me, beyonce. i see that you and i slept together again last night. >>brian: do you mean purple? >>gretchen: sure. let's do headlines. three americans were unfor
a volley and government. the democrats typically say, well, government can do this or can't do that ask so it's really a series of arguments over the role of government and the second thing i'm curious to know about is how tough they were in a pretty partisan atmosphere. he has gotten tougher over the past couple of years with the opposition. how feist you he is he during the speech. >> things people have picked up in this run up to this inauguration is that the president four years ago in his speech came tout and he actually made a comment about how he was going to to bring an end to the petty grievances and false promises in washington. now four years later was that a false promise? >> yes. i mean, the president, i think, understandably confident and an historic election and all of that perhaps overstated what could be done. this is one place where he seen having come fiercely short and it's in bringing that sense to washington of bipartisanship and of working together and overcoming partisanship and his defenders and supporters will say oh, the republicans have been intransient and smal
, expansive government." the chairwoman of the house republican conference said "the president's out word words must be matched with actions regarding the country's fiscal health," suggesting a gulf between the two." good morning, your thoughts on the inaugural address? caller: i thought that it was wonderful. i thought that the speech was very insightful. the keylieve that's words were we the people. together we will do all the things we set out to do. host: he talked about preserving medicare, social security. he talked about climate change, equal rights for gay couples and women. is that your priority list? caller: maybe not in that order, but the president has a hard job and congress has got to work together with him. i believe that we have good republicans. many people in the country believed in the position of the president and that the congress will go along, eventually. host: all right, douglas. your priority list? top five? top three? caller code jobs, education, and for the end of the war. -- caller: jobs, education, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on
found, the government warns there are more credible threats of kidnapping attempts. they had a lot of this information is fluid. conor powell joins us live. >> reporter: hundreds of hostages have been freed, but according to a algerian officia, they've spent the day sifting through the debris and bodies of those not as fortunate. according to a private private television station in algeria. the authorities at the gas plant found dozens of bodies, last count 25 that have been identified and found in that facility, but making it difficult to actually identify who they are is from the problem that they're so badly damaged, they can't tell if they were hostages or members of the islam i can militant terrorists that overtook and attacked that building. also making things difficult, there are reports of booby traps and mines and bombs all over the facility, so identifying and rescuing and pulling these bodies out so they can be shipped back to their home countries is going very, very slow because of awful these sort of other problems. now, algeria's government said in total, 32 islamic m
. it was forth right in setting out a vision of a kind of government that obama wants. in a way, it was, like, it was kind of a liberal version of reagan's first inaugural where he disparaged government. this was a firm defense of a word he dared to use. of clengtive action. and bill the way, that one drove them nuts at fox news. >> well, bob, the president referenced this early in his speech, very much like lincoln did. >> for history tells us that while these truths may be self evident, that they've never been self executing. that while freedom is a gift from god, it must be secured by his people here on earth. the patriots of 1776 did not fight to replace the tyranny of a king with the privileges of a few. or the rule of a mob. they gave to us a republic, a government of and by and for the people. in trusting each generation to keep safe our founding creed. >> i think i've heard this from liberals and i think it's something very important. we all accept the fact that our rights are innate, they come with our birth, they aren't given to us by a government. but, oftentimes, it has taken a go
to discuss it they did reimburse the district of columbia government some $44 million for the last inauguration in 2009. that probably just scratches the surface of the cost the taxpayers are putting. if you look over the parade route the police presence is just unbelievable. there are probably police officers every 10 feet. i did some quick calculations, it is 1.6 miles from the capitol to the white house and with police interspersed that often on the parade route alone there are over 1700 police officers. that of course does not include the plainclothes guys filtering in and out of the crowd, the 40 or so police agencies including capitol police, secret service, national park police and police from surrounding jurisdictions who have come here to help out. we're told that the parade route now is closed off to all people because the parade route is filled up. however there are ticketed areas where there is still lots of room. i think a hunch maybe a third or half as many people are expected for inauguration as last one is probably right about right on. shep? shepard: thank you, sir
indoor and know the importance of making sure our government protect and serve those who protect and serve us. as an attorney and as the dean as one of the top public interest law schools, i run an institution that permits access to justice and seek to train the next generation of leaders and public servants. as a candidate for michigan secretary of state in 2010, early support from emily's list helped me to raise my voice and share my story. a stopper came to michigan, looked me in the eye and she said she knew i had it in me to win. thanks to her support, i was able to earn more votes than any other democratic candidate in the state and become the highest democratic votes debtor in michigan in 2010. -- vote getter in 2010. this means early support an early investment in young female candidates. it means nurturing us, our careers, and strengthening our ability to lead. it also means recognizing that our vote is our voice. we must work, each one of us must work come to make sure that women run and vote. women voters everywhere are informed and engaged, ready to participate. liste
a handgun in your house. the other things, that's subject to government regulation. they overreached. the mothre they overreached, i warned them, i have been a member all my life -- >> that's nice. >> i will do it again. >> willie, what's my biggest fault. >> you love a little too much. >> that is it. >> i love a little too much. i shared some of that love last week. anyw anyway, it is a still not too late. they can come to the table and be part of a comprehensive package. i'm sure joe biden will accept them and joe manchin will accept them and conservatives will accept them to come to the table. i'm sure their membership wants them to do it, not the survivalists or gun manufacturers who have made millions of dollars off the death of 6 and 7 year-olds, the truth. it's not too late. if they keep their feet in cement, they're going to be run over, not by joe biden, but these polls show, by middle america, by gun owners, by people that want to protect their children when they're at school, they want to protect their children at shopping malls, want to protect their children when they're
. that is the reason. if the government had a list of who has guns, the belief is that if a tyrant or tyrannical rule of law makers takes over, they know who to go for to take away guns. that is to take away freedom. it is a longstanding belief. this is also what informed people, touching on the immigration issue, people who did not want to have a national id card, something that will weed out illegal immigrants if you have an id card, a lot of people believe that that is an infringement of rights as well. the have centralized lists, that is one libertarian and other people began to get worried about government power. i believe the instant background checks, there are rules about how long the government to keep the intermission of who applied for a gun permit -- who has been able to purchase any firearm under that were so great about the government having the list that are required to get rid of the ever mission or dispose of it within a time. . -- within a time period. host: lloyd is joining us from pennsylvania on the republican line. caller: there are two items i want to try to do quickly. why is
, is a stokely carmichael and huey newton and timothy leary went to war against the united states government and one. [laughter] that's just how important -- impossible it seemed when it all began. >> mr. standiford, of the american colonies, who in your opinion was most radical in terms of methods? >> who was most radical? well, certainly in his passion, in its desperate passion and in his ability to convey it and his ability to rally troops, or supporters, it was a sam adams. i believe that if it had not been for sam adams, would we have -- people always are fond of asking this question. did the sons of liberty really bring us, create a revolution? my answer is yes. history shows it. would there have been a revolution had these men not done what they did as they did at the time they did? maybe. when, we don't know. it would have been the leaders of the battles, we can't be sure. and how -- some say we could have ended up like canada. yes, we would have probably broken away from great britain, but in the way that canada did. there's speculation along those lines. the other interesting thing
. they gave to us a republic, a government of and by and for the people, entrusting each generation to keep safe our founding creed. for more of the 200 years we have had. we have learned that no union founded on the principles of liberty and equality could survive half buried. we made ourselves a new and we vowed to move forward together. together we determined that a modern economy requires railroads and highways to see travel and commerce. schools and colleges to train our workers. together we discovered that a free market only works with your competition and fair play. together we resolve that a great nation must care for it the vulnerable and protect its people from life's worst hazards and misfortunes. to it all, we have never relinquished our skepticism of central authority. nor have we succumb to the fictions that ills can be cured through government alone. our celebration of a nation, and enterprise, our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility. these are constant in our character. we have always understood that when times change, so we do too. fidelity to our founding p
americans held by islamic militants. u.s. government officials tell cnn that may not necessarily, though, be the case. let's get straight to our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence working this story for us. chris, be what is the very latest that you're hearing? >> wolf, the latest that we're getting from u.s. officials is that some americans may have escaped but some may still be held by those hostage takers and they are still seeing signs perhaps of some intermittent fighting, suggesting that perhaps this isn't over yet. as the hostage situation stretched to a second day, u.s. officials scrambled to find a resolution and determine the state of the americans still in militant hands. >> this incident will be resolved, we hope with a minimum loss of life. but when you deal with these relentless terrorists, life is not in any way precious to them. >> americans and other western workers were on as about when multiple militants attacked. the militants took hostage at this gas plant heavily armed with rocket grenades and forced some hostages to wear explosive vests. the militants may have t
in a region that drought is going to develop, hopefully there will be preparedness plans in place, government action, that are going to move us towards putting in place some mitigation measures, measures that will reduce impacts. we can certainly, i mean, there are some states in the united states that is gone to great lengths and have invested a lot of resources in preparedness planning. those models are transferable to other states that are more reactive in nature. we certainly need to continue to work to improve early warning systems, as i mentioned before. the combination of those long lead times, the forecast in early warning systems, which are very comprehensive, the one thing about drought is it's important yes, to measure rainfall and temperature, but it's also important to know what's happening in the entire water supply system. so we need to know the status of reservoirs, status of groundwater, status of stream flow, soil moisture, snow impact. all of those will lead into what will define the security of drought. >> margaret, if i could have you enter that same question, what could
. reinvigorating a mature nation means giving government to give people the tools to compete but then opening up a wide field so they do so ruak cowsly creatively. it means spending more here but de regulating more there. it means facing the fact we do have to choose between current benefits to seniors and investments in our future, and that to pretend we don't face that choice as obama did is effectively to sacrifice the future to the past. >> jonathan, first, what do you think of this speech and secondly, what do you think of david's column? >> i thought the president's speech was terrific, a progressive vision for the country. the guy won twice and ran on all the things he talked about yesterday, inclusion, balanced approach to the nation's problems. when it comes to david brooks' column, as mika was reading, i was thinking, how is that different from what the president actually said? i mean, he's talking about how, you know, what he wants to do is what he's been saying all along, a balanced approach. we have to take care of our seniors and take care of the middle class. we have to take care
of the area's conservative tide. >> in this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem. >> but the most recent inaugural address was that given by barack obama. >> this is the price and the promise of citizen ship. this is the source of our confidence, the knowledge that god calls on us to shape and uncertain destiny. this is the meaning of our liberty and our creed, why men and women and children of every race and every faith can join in celebration across this magnificent mall, and why a man whose father who less than 60 years ago might not have been served in a local restaurant can now stand before you to take a most sacred oath. >> wow. at its best, inaugural justice for a presidency, what a lead sentence does for a book. it captures the duration of what's to come. a great presidency often begins with a great statement. in the day that make that statement is within moments of taking the oath itself. jon meacham is the author of "thomas jefferson: the art of power" way up on the new york times best sellers list and he joins me now. i'm here
group of people who think this is not an appropriate function of government. i'm not one of those. that's not what this was about today. i want this money to go to the folks in the northeast. the question today was whether or not we thought it was important enough to pay for it now or whether or not we were going to pay for it later and make our children and grandchildren pay for it. that was the discussion. i think it's a fair discussion to have. >> all right. well -- but, is it not fair to also point up that in terms of some of your colleagues, there's some blatant hypocrisy? 67 republicans that voted against the $9 billion package. but 37 of them supported emergency aid following disasters in their own states. and you're one of them. the fact is, congressman, you actually received help from a disaster relief program. in 2011 you testified on a committee of small businesses and here's what you said. you said i've actually participated in disaster assistance relief. i showed up six months after i started my business one morning to find my office furniture floating in the front yard. we
and renewal this time around, but is the government broken? the whole system. and what can we do to fix it? people want washington and its politicians to work together. the politicians as yet have not been a i believe to figure out how to do that. but, you know, inaugural speeches can sometimes change the mood. you heard fdr, the only thing we have to fear. i remember when gerald ford said our long national nightmare is over. jack kennedy, ask not what you can do for your country. difference in how the nation feels about itself and about what's going on. i would say this. if there was a time when this country needed to hear a good speech and wanted to hear a good one, i think this would be the time. so let's hope we get a good one. >> of course, there was lincoln's second inaugural where he talked about the wounds of the nation. we know that the president has been working on this president for weeks and major garrett, our chief white house correspondent, is at the white house this morning with a little bit of insight on what we might hear today. >> well, good morning, scott. those closest
years? >> i hope he's learned that you know, no one part of the government, really, gets it all done. and so, he's got to do a better job of reaching out to members of congress, across both -- across the aisle, to the republicans. and the republicans have to stop buying into things that demonize the president. why aren't republican leaders shouting out about all this birther nonsense and these other things? they're silent. they need to speak out. this is the kind of intolerance i've been talking about, where these idiot presentations continue to be made. and you don't see the senior leadership of the party say, no, that's wrong. sometimes, by not speaking out, they're encouraging it. and the base keeps buying this stuff. and it's killing the base and party. 26% favorability rate for the party right now. that ought to be telling them something. you know? instead of attacking, whoever speaks, look in the mirror and say, how are we going to win the next election? >> and looking overseas, we know governments over the world will be pouring over this speech for every nuance, at this time,
of my party who think that this is not a proper function of the government. i happen to disagree. i've lived through hurricanes and floods myself, i think this is a proper and appropriate function of the government. my difficulty with it, it is simply not paid for, we're borrowing this additional money to do this and i just think that's wrong. >> what his amendment would do would cut $17 billion in spending across the board in every sector of the government including defense, including vets. i was talking to somebody on capitol hill who said that amount of money is the entire operating budget, akin to the entire operating budget of the agriculture department. we do not think it will pass but it really gives a sense of why the speaker got himself in so much trouble by pulling this before the night of new year's day, because of this very reason, he knew there were a number of republicans who were very upset about passing any new government spending without cutting it elsewhere and it's going to play out on the house floor today. >> we're going to talk more about this later. dana bash
through the association that governs the national mall. that is is a breakthrough across what may come to it that there are a number of civic minded things we will be able to do if we are lucky enough to have excess funds. >> john with cnn. whoever can address this. how many law enforcement agencies and officers will be involved in security on the day of the inoculation and also how large of an area will be closed off the street closures? >> first i want to apologize for saying there was more than one -- this afternoon but to answer your question we cannot go into detail as far as how many law-enforcement officers will be present for the end i duration and could you repeat your second question form a? [inaudible] >> how much of the area will be closed off? >> we have road closures in effect and i can touch base with you afterwards to provide that. [inaudible] >> with all events that happen on the capital complex we trying constantly to address them. as far specific threats, i can answer that right now but just know that myself -- though not by self, than the united states capital capit
you can do for your country, nothing to fear but fear itself, government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem, all from first inaugural addresses. >> right. >> second inaugurals get kind of overlooked in the sweep of history, all well written but tend not to be as definitive. there is a hurdle, a second term curse, if you will, that president obama's going to have to address to hit it out of the park tomorrow. >> you said, the article, i read your article, you said what -- can you name one phrase in president obama's first speech that's memorable. i can't really -- >> there's no golden nugget. there was nothing. there was nothing. i think there was such high hopes for it. you said 2 million people, the first african-american president to take the oath of office, on the steps of the capitol, which was built by slaves and here we have transcended that moment by electing a black president. he has another bite of the apple h >> the moment was historic. how does he change the mood in this country? how can he change the mood of this country? >> it's interesting, b
government spending, they want this town to operate better than it does. >> one note here for parents whose children are home today, a holiday from school, we're going to be on the air for many hours and if i might, have them stop by and sit in front of the tv and watch this. because especially coming off this political season, and with all the troubles we've witnessed as a nation, this is the -- kind of the best of america in action. this is something we do well and this is a living history lesson today. yes, all of us who are here to cover it love this sort of thing and wouldn't miss it for the world, but this is how an interest in history and politics can get kindled at a young age. and it's one of the great spectacles available for free from home. savannah guthrie, i heard someone say this past week that this time around, four years later, the highs are not so high and the lows are not so low, meaning yes, the crowd won't number 2 million. the history of this administration has already been made. but also the economy isn't in a fr fr freefall. it doesn't feel as dire as it did. >> as yo
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